Author Topic: DIY - Changed my chain  (Read 1756 times)

Brammofan

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DIY - Changed my chain
« on: August 22, 2012, 07:49:12 PM »
I had ordered an O-ring chain a while ago and hadn't gotten around to installing it -- thrifty me wanted to wear out my previous chain first. 

I got tired of waiting for my current chain to wear out - but it was due for a tensioning adjustment today.  I decided to swap it out instead.

It went pretty well - had to buy a new split pin for the axle nut. Other than that, I basically followed some advice given by good ol' Richard230 - I pulled the master link out of the old chain and hooked the new chain to it.  Ran it around the front sprocket until the two new ends were close; dropped the old chain off and... dang - of course the new chain won't fit yet - the axle is too far aft.  Did some adjusting with the 13mm wrench, bringing the axle forward - voila! Put the two ends together with the new master link, snapped the spring clip on, adjusted the slack again, tightened it all up - 40.6 ft/lbs on that axle nut - slapped some more lube on that puppy, and I'm ready to go for tomorrow's commute.
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Brammofan

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Re: DIY - Changed my chain
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2012, 12:06:22 PM »
What an amazing difference!
It's definitely quieter than the non-o-ring chain.
Not sure about anything that might affect range, but it felt more powerful. :)
I strongly urge all you current owners with non-o-ring chains to upgrade. 
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Richard230

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Re: DIY - Changed my chain
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2012, 04:12:35 PM »
Congratulations, Brammofan. Frankly, you were lucky to find an O-ring chain that used a spring clip to secure the master link pins.  Most O-ring chains on the market use a rivet-type master link that requires you to use a somewhat expensive tool to flare the ends of the link pins to keep the end plate on.

Anyone purchasing an O-ring chain should verify that it comes with a master link that uses a spring clip - or plan on purchasing one of several chain riveting tools that are on the market, such as sold by Motion Pro, Cycle Gear, RK chain, etc.  Expect to pay anywhere from $80 to $180 for the tool. The more they cost the better the quality.  I own and have used the Motion Pro tool for years and it works well.  I believe that Motion Pro has just introduced a new simple and compact combination tool that will break the chain, press on the link plate and also rivet the pins.  It looks like a good tool to me and seems to be easier to use than their old chain-breaking tool kit like I have.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2012, 05:38:16 PM by Richard230 »
current bikes: 2014 14.2 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2007 BMW R1200R, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.

Richard230

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Re: DIY - Changed my chain
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2012, 04:57:02 PM »
Anyone looking for a chain breaker and rivet tool might want to check out the one sold by Cycle Gear (their product No. 28165). It appears to be an exact knockoff of the Motion Pro tool that I have. I just received their September sale brochure and this tool is on sale for only $39.99, about half what I paid for mine.
current bikes: 2014 14.2 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2007 BMW R1200R, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.

Richard230

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Re: DIY - Changed my chain
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2013, 10:02:51 AM »
Here is a link to an article illustrating how replace worn sprockets and how to cut and pin a typical O-ring type riveted master link chain.  While it leaves out some details, it gives you an idea of what is involved in the process:

http://rideapart.com/2013/05/how-to-change-a-motorcycle-chain/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+HellForLeather+%28Hell+For+Leather%29
current bikes: 2014 14.2 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2007 BMW R1200R, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.